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“Hunting” Frieze, 1905. Cecil Aldin1935). Produced by Arthur Sanderson & Sons, Ltd., London, England. Block printed on ingrain paper. Gift of Standard Coated Products, 1975-2-5-a/g
Children’s Frieze Makes Learning Fun
Children's Frieze Makes Learning Fun Cecil Aldin was a well-known painter and book illustrator, highly esteemed for his animal portraiture. This children’s frieze was made up of seven different panels that would be joined end to end to form a non-repeating scene thirty-five feet long. This is long enough to wrap around an average-size room...
Sampler, 1825. Embroidered by Catharine Parsells. Embroidered in silk on linen. Bequest of Gertrude M. Oppenheimer, 1981-28-135
Not Only Ours
The Quakers, or the Society of Friends, played a primary role in establishing the earliest charity schools in New York City, which provided access to secular education for those who would not otherwise have had the opportunity. During the Revolutionary War, the Quakers' strict adherence to principles of non-violence made them suspect to their countrymen....
Sidewall, Shells, 1968-69. Frederick Bradley. Made by Woodson Wallpapers, Inc. New York, New York, USA; Screenprint on paper. Gift of Woodson Wallpapers, Inc., 1969-54-3
No Shell Shock with this Design
The Shells wallpaper is an interesting hybrid design combining a traditional vining floral design and shell art, or coquillage. The vine, foliage, and flowers are all composed of a variety of large and small sea shells. This design is screenprinted in five colors on a white ground. The 1960s sparked a revival of historical styles...
Print, New Urban Ground, Proposal for Rising Currents Exhibition, 2009. ARO (founded 1993) and dlandstudio (founded 2005). Museum purchase from Architecture Research Office and from General Acquisitions Endowment Fund, 2013-52-1
Rising Currents
In 2009-10 five teams of architects, landscape architects, and other professionals were invited to take part in a workshop at PS 1, organized by MoMA and Barry Bergdoll, then Head of the Architecture and Design Department, to address the problem of global warming and its impact on lower Manhattan. This was three years before Hurricane...
R-72, “Toot-A-Loop” Portable Radio, ca. 1970. Manufactured by National Panasonic Radio brand, Matushita Electrical Industrial Co., Ltd., Japan. Gift of Jacqueline Loewe Fowler, 2007-37-5
Staying in the Loop
The R-72, also called the “Toot-A-Loop,” is a wonderful example of Pop Art-inspired design. Departing from the square box format, this battery-operated portable radio is shaped like a donut with an off-center hole. It could be worn on the wrist like a bracelet or carried like a purse.  Simply by twisting the swivel joint at...
Poster: IBM, Every Man with an Idea Has at Least Two or Three Followers. Ken White (American, 1935-1985). Gift of Various Donors, 1981-29-442
A Bright Idea
Over a century ago, IBM founder, Chairman and CEO Thomas J. Watson Sr. (1874-1956) held a meeting with NCR (formerly National Cash Register) sales managers to brainstorm ways to improve the business. With little progress made, Watson’s frustration led him to declare the following: “The trouble with every one of us is that we don’t...
Decorative Views of Technology
From telescopes to the Erie Canal, to planes, trains and automobiles, technological innovations have long been incorporated into wallpaper designs. With cast iron reaching new aesthetic and structural heights in architecture beginning in the 1850s, it made sense to capture its more decorative aspect in a wallpaper design. This paper highlights views of New York...
Drawing, "Fatehpur Sikri" Birbal's Palace, India, March 19, 1881. Lockwood de Forest. Gifted by a Private Santa Barbara Collector, courtesy of Sullivan Goss - An American Art Gallery, 2013-38-2
A Wonderful Red in the Sunlight
This sketch documents Lockwood de Forest’s trip to India. In 1880, he and Meta Kemble were married in New York and soon thereafter they departed for India on their combined honeymoon and buying trip. By this time, de Forest had already abandoned landscape painting as a profession and committed himself to design and the decorative...
Woman's Ceremonial Skirt, Democratic Republic of Congo
Unwound from the Round
            This woman’s ceremonial dance skirt from the Kuba people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo reflects the rich artistic textile traditions of a diverse kingdom inhabiting the fertile lands between the Kasai and Sankuru Rivers in Sub-Saharan Central Africa. Kuba cloth is made from woven raffia fiber derived...
Sidewall, "Faltenwurf" (Shadow-Folds), 1971-72. Paul Wunderlich (German, 1927-2010). Made by Marburg Wallpaper Company. Machine-printed on paper. Museum purchase from Sarah Cooper-Hewitt Fund, 1992-110-1
Your Very Own Secret Garden
Garden Court is one of the largest screen-printed wallcoverings in the Museum’s collection, and is said to be the “largest silk screen ever printed in one piece.” Because of its large size, measuring 8×6 feet, the printing necessitated a special rag paper, with a single sheet for each print. The print run was limited to...