Author: Gregory Herringshaw

SORT BY:
Frieze, 1900-05
A Hunting We Will Go
Landscape friezes were popularized by Walter Crane’s May Tree frieze in 1896 and remained popular into the 1920s. Beginning around 1900 many wide friezes were developed for children, and this hunting frieze would have been appropriate for a boy’s room as well as a library or dining room. This panel shows the hunters, horses and...
Sidewall, “Tudor Rose”, 1874-1920
Tynecastle Canvas
This Tudor Rose pattern of Tynecastle Canvas is one of a very few textile wallcoverings in the Museum’s collection. Tudor Rose consists of a single repeating element, a foliage sprig with a dominant tudor rose along with several smaller flowers. This motif is tightly melded with its repeating cohorts so forms a nice all-over pattern,...
Frieze, 1900
Creating a Beautiful Learning Environment for Children
After viewing this wallpaper frieze in the collection numerous times and always being enamored by its simplicity and charm, I finally took the initiative to do some research to see what it actually was. Stylized birds and peacock feathers are intertwined with a scrolling rinceau pattern, creating a delightful frieze pattern. The design is rendered in a...
Large-scale photo enlargement of thorny rose stems creating a stripe pattern. The largest stem is centered while the right and left sides are mirror images of the other. Printed in pink, burgundy and white on taupe ground.
Some Thorny Wallpaper
I have always been drawn to this wallpaper design. It is a beautifully rendered stripe pattern created using differently-scaled photo enlargements of rose stems. The varying thickness of the stems and the color contrast create a wonderful flow to the design, and while it is a strong design it’s not too heavy. One thing I...
Overlapping, horizontally and vertically-aligned straight-sided elipses, outlined and filled with wide bandings in deep red, cherry red, and shocking pink.
Will Not Fade into the Background
Compendium was part of the "Palladio 8 Collection" which contained 38 designs by 22 different designers. Geometric patterns dominated surface design in the 1960s and op art and pop art were major sources of inspiration. Op art created optical illusions by distorting patterns, and many patterns were created using design fragmentation, psychedelia or historic revivalism....
Embossed and printed wallpapers simulating the woven fabrics of Dorothy Liebes. Twenty-five single sheets with note on the back of each giving the name of each design, the price and pattern number.
From the Loom to the Wall
In 1947 the Cooper Union received a sample book featuring the new wallpaper collection designed by Dorothy Liebes for United Wallpapers. The book contains eight different patterns with each shown in multiple colorways. The patterns are all based on the hand-loomed woven fabrics for which Liebes had become known. She introduced color and texture into...
Pre-trimmed paper-backed washable vinyl wallcovering. Swirls of water or flames printed in shades of blue.
Mary McFadden Dresses the Walls
Sanscrit is one of ten different designs from Mary McFadden’s first collection of wallpaper for Kirk-Brummel’s Raintree Designs. The collection is based on McFadden’s travels abroad where she studied different cultures and was especially inspired by such ancient cultures as pre-Columbian, Coptic and Byzantine. She re-invents the essence of these antique discoveries with a contemporary...
Repeating design of widely-spaced irregular circular shapes, printed in taupe flock on a very pale beige or taupe ground.
Not to be Served for Breakfast
This paper may look familiar as it was included in the Design Is Not Art exhibition at the Cooper-Hewitt.  Eiweiss also appeared on the cover of Nest magazine in the fall of 1998.  Trockel is a sculptor, printmaker and designer and is a well-known figure of the contemporary art scene in Germany, with her work...
Strips of coiled newsprint are woven with nylon filaments on handlooms in the manner of grasscloth. Made from 100% recycled newsprint.
Black and White and Read All Over
Newsworthy is a handsome wallpaper that puts a new spin on an old technique. Woven on handlooms using the same technique as traditional grasscloth wallcoverings, the wallpaper is composed of 100% recycled newspaper and nylon filament. Newsworthy offers a nice texture, as well as subtle bits of pattern and color. As each of the woven...