Author: Gregory Herringshaw

SORT BY:
Sidewall, Shells, 1968-69. Frederick Bradley. Made by Woodson Wallpapers, Inc. New York, New York, USA; Screenprint on paper. Gift of Woodson Wallpapers, Inc., 1969-54-3
No Shell Shock with this Design
The Shells wallpaper is an interesting hybrid design combining a traditional vining floral design and shell art, or coquillage. The vine, foliage, and flowers are all composed of a variety of large and small sea shells. This design is screenprinted in five colors on a white ground. The 1960s sparked a revival of historical styles...
Decorative Views of Technology
From telescopes to the Erie Canal, to planes, trains and automobiles, technological innovations have long been incorporated into wallpaper designs. With cast iron reaching new aesthetic and structural heights in architecture beginning in the 1850s, it made sense to capture its more decorative aspect in a wallpaper design. This paper highlights views of New York...
Sidewall, "Faltenwurf" (Shadow-Folds), 1971-72. Paul Wunderlich (German, 1927-2010). Made by Marburg Wallpaper Company. Machine-printed on paper. Museum purchase from Sarah Cooper-Hewitt Fund, 1992-110-1
Your Very Own Secret Garden
Garden Court is one of the largest screen-printed wallcoverings in the Museum’s collection, and is said to be the “largest silk screen ever printed in one piece.” Because of its large size, measuring 8×6 feet, the printing necessitated a special rag paper, with a single sheet for each print. The print run was limited to...
Sidewall, "Faltenwurf" (Shadow-Folds), 1971-72. Paul Wunderlich (German, 1927-2010). Made by Marburg Wallpaper Company. Machine-printed on paper. Museum purchase from Sarah Cooper-Hewitt Fund, 1992-110-1
Like Hide and Seek
German wallpaper manufacturers have been commissioning renowned artists to design wallpapers for many years, and this practice became especially prominent in the post-war period. In the early 1970s, the Marburg Wallpaper Company approached a diverse group of international artists to create wallpaper designs that would reflect the taste of the time. The company wanted to...
Bandbox and lid, Castle Garden, ca. 1830–40; USA; Block-printed paper on wood support; Gift of Eleanor and Sarah Hewitt, 1918-19-7-a,b
From Protector to Entertainer, The Different Faces of Castle Garden
The building illustrated on this bandbox has served many purposes over the years. Built in 1808, it originally was used as a stronghold in New York Harbor for the War of 1812 and was first known as Southwest Battery and renamed Castle Clinton in 1817. In 1823 the Federal Government deeded the fort to New...
Polka-dot design with a vertical orientation. Printed in shades of green on a white ground, the size of the dots varies, and each has the appearance of being "dropped" onto the page.
A More Fluid Polka Dot
“Drop” is from J. Abbott Miller’s second collection of wallpaper for Knoll Textiles called “The Ink Collection”. Based on Miller’s experiments with the liquid movement of ink, and how ink reacts as it moves across the surface of paper, each design has a random look but still maintains a feeling of control. “Drop” forms a...
A large medallion of pastoral scene. In foreground, young woman feeding pigeons, a lamb bedside her; ruined tower in distance. Enclosing framework of rococo scrolls and foliage. Garden tools, doves and roses. Printed in gold, green and apricot on slate-gray field.
Landscape Views
The Livingston is a pattern inspired by an earlier wallpaper design, and gets its name from the home in which the antique document was found. It is said the wallpaper fragments were scraped off the walls of the Livingston manor house in Catskill, New York and mailed to the Birge Company. The original design was...
Gathered blue drapery with lace edging in white. Blue ribbon caught with medallions along bottom edge; was probably meant to be cut out to use as chair rail. Both motifs are ornamented with white pearls and black scroll and bead design.
Drape the Walls
The great degree of realism achieved in this wallpaper border was created with the use of relatively few (about ten) colors. To achieve a true sense of depth in any given motif, be it a flower or drapery, the design needs to be printed in five to six different shades, with a different wood block...
Sidewall, 1918-23
A Sophisticated Floral
While Ruhlmann is better known for his beautifully designed and executed furniture and interior decoration, he also designed a number of wallpapers. This is an early design produced before he got into his brightly colored Art Deco phase. While still drawing upon an Art Nouveau aesthetic with its meandering vines and organic nature, the restrained...