Author: Mae Colburn

SORT BY:
1974-23-6
Lydia’s New York
Batik, an ancient craft often associated with Indonesia, became popular in United States in the 1910s and 20s, with artists such as Arthur Crisp, Pieter Mijer, and Lydia Bush-Brown attracting national attention. These artists worked in the traditional manner, painting paraffin and beeswax on their cloth to create a resist, but expanded the traditional design...
Handkerchief, World's Fair, 1939, screen printed silk
A Souvenir from the Fair
The 1939 World’s Fair at Flushing Meadows Park in Queens was themed the ‘World of Tomorrow.’ Visitors came away with visions of radio-controlled highways, mechanical milking machines, and the 7-foot-tall Westinghouse robot. Many also left with Fair memorabilia, from the pins given away at the Futurama exhibition that read ‘I have seen the future,’ to...
Screen printed silk scarf by Ascher Squares, 1947, England
Scarf Art
This headscarf is one of a series known as the Ascher Squares, produced as part of an historic collaboration between Ascher Studios, an haute couture textile company in London, and more than fifty modern artists, including Henry Moore, Jean Cocteau, Alexander Calder, and painter André Derain, who designed the headscarf featured here. Ascher Studios gave...
Printed textile, Raoul Dufy, 1913, France
Raoul Dufy: Painter as Textile Designer
Although best known as a painter, Raoul Dufy was also a skilled printer of woodcuts. In 1910, with the encouragement of fashion designer Paul Poiret, he began translating his woodcuts into fabric designs. His reputation quickly grew, and in 1912 he signed a contract with Lyons-based silk weaving company Bianchini Férier to produce printing plates...
Fiber and air
Fiber and Air: A Net by Joanne Segal Brandford
“My ordinary materials are fiber and air,” explained textile artist and scholar Joanne Segal Brandford in a university lecture in 1993, and it’s true. Whether made of coarse bands of rattan or fine strands of nylon, her nets, fabrics, and baskets seem to rest lightly in space. In its most basic form, a net is...
Woven hanging of black linen with wide fringe at bottom, ornamented with feathers
Feathers and Linen: Lenore Tawney’s Woven Assemblage
In a 1971 article, Lenore Tawney’s studio was described as a “gymnasium sized” space filled with “clumps of projects in progress – feathers, egg shells, and delicate animal bones ready for inclusion” in the artist’s weavings and assemblages.[1] One can easily imagine Mourning Dove, pictured above, coalescing from these materials. Tawney is a revered figure...
Long vertical hanging depicting a woman with a walking stick standing on a curving path lined with tulips, with two children in the foreground.
Teaching as Art: The Tapestry Art of Ann-Mari Kornerup
Tapestry weaver Ann-Mari Kornerup (1918-2006) frequently depicted scenes of everyday life. Many include children. Kornerup was born in Stockholm, Sweden and studied at the Swedish School of Textiles, Borås. She moved to Denmark after her marriage to Danish architect Jørgen K. Ebbe and established a weaving workshop in Charlottenlund, outside of Copenhagen, in 1951. A...
Stylized street scene woven in greens, brown, gold and natural color wefts.
At the 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition
California textile artist Lydia van Gelder (1911-2012) created this piece for the 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition (GGIE) in San Francisco. Having taken up weaving only several years before, her inclusion in the GGIE marks the beginning of a distinguished career as both an exhibiting artist and textile arts educator. Best known now for her...
Hanging depicting three women in front of a cluster of houses, in browns, grays, blues, orange, yellow and white on a natural ground.
Weaving Outside the Lines
Active from the 1940s through the 1980s, Finnish artist Eva Anttila famously wove, or had a hand in weaving, every tapestry that bears her name. With pieces now in the permanent collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Helsinki, and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, her work is considered an enduring expression of the...